BODY WOODS

Guitar Body woods, or Tone Woods as they are commonly known, have an influence over the tone of the instrument. Just how great an influence, has been hotly debated over the years. Some preach that it is one of the most important factors in a guitar's tone, others disagree.

What do we think? We believe it has a noticeable effect on the tone as it has played a part in those distinctive tonal characteristics created by the classic guitar designs.

As well as tone, weight, appearance and cost are considerations. Read on for our guide on how we think each wood performs.  Remember, this is very subjective and there can be variance between different cuts of the same wood species;  it's a natural product after all. 🌳 

ALDER 

Alder is an extremely common tone wood. The chances are that you have played an alder body guitar. It is reasonably priced and is quite light. We think is sounds great when combined with a Walnut or Maple neck. Its middling tonal characteristics mean it provides a good neutral base to build upon.

TONE

WEIGHT

SWAMP ASH 

Another classic tone wood found in vintage and modern guitars. It is extremely light and has a distinctive grain, which is well suited to open-pore finishes. It gives an ever so slightly brighter tone than Alder, but also creates a great tonal base from which to build on.

TONE

WEIGHT

MAHOGANY 

At the opposite end of the popular guitar spectrum you'll find Mahogany. This tone wood is use in LP guitars. It is much heavier and more expensive than the aforementioned tone woods. It has a much warmer characteristic tone which contributes to that distinctive LP growl. We wouldn't recommend this if you have a bad back! 

TONE

WEIGHT

WALNUT 

Walnut is all about looks. Under a clear finish, its grain can be mesmerising. It is similar in weight and cost to Mahogany, but offers a far brighter tone. The brightest of all our body tone woods on offer. 

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TONE

WEIGHT